whatsdifferentincanada:

image

Family Day is a provincial holiday occurring on the third Monday in February in Alberta, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Ontario, and P.E.I. In Manitoba and P.E.I. it’s called Louis Riel Day and Islander Day, respectively. BC, ever the unique little snowflake, celebrates Family Day on the second…

I wish Family Day was known as Louis Riel Day in the rest of Canada as well. I say this an Ontarian, helplessly anglophone. He was a great Canadian, important, possibly batshit crazy with a messiah complex, and controversial all the same. But the government of Canada from the early days of John A. MacDonald and the RCMP all the way to today have treated the Native population like shit, and we need to celebrate these champions of the downtrodden and disenfranchised no matter how flawed their character may be.

jordanmorris:

Against Me! - Live on Letterman

Rocks, don’t it?

"FUCKMYLIFE666" from the awesome new Against Me! album, Transgender Dysphoria Blues.

Tags: against me!

nyrbclassics:


Household described himself as “a sort of bastard by Stevenson out of Conrad”, and the literary genealogy for Rogue Male seems clear enough. Robert Louis Stevenson’s Kidnapped (1886) began the “hunted-man” genre. John Buchan’s The Thirty-Nine Steps (1915) updated it for an age of geopolitics and aerial surveillance. Graham Greene’s A Gun for Sale (1936) extended its geographies and reversed the logic of pursuit, so the assassin became the quarry. From these writers Household learned the skill of pacing and the propulsive narrative power of the chase.
… .
I first read Rogue Male 20 years or so ago, rapidly and unreflectively, pulled onwards by its plot. It was only later, and on several rereadings, that the complexities of its patterns began to reveal themselves. This is a novel of elaborate design. There are paired concepts – “cover” and “open”, “surface” and “depth” – that repeat and weave. There are motifs – notably sunken tracks, tunnels, and skins/skinning – that recur dozens of times in different forms. And there is a sustained analogy between land and mind, whereby the narrator’s access to his buried emotions is enabled only by means of a literal digging into the Jurassic bedrock of south-west Dorset.
—Robert Macfarlane, from the introduction to his book (co-written with Stanley Donwood and Dan Richards) about Rogue Male, Holloway

The reader who sent in this entry into the Classics and Coffee Club notes that all the items in the photo were “bought in Seoul, KR.” The book itself was purchased at What the Book?, and English-language bookstore.
Do you have a picture of one of our books with coffee or tea (hot or iced)? Send it to this address and we’ll post them here (making you an honorary member of the Classics and Coffee Club).

There’s a club that has me as a member!

nyrbclassics:

Household described himself as “a sort of bastard by Stevenson out of Conrad”, and the literary genealogy for Rogue Male seems clear enough. Robert Louis Stevenson’s Kidnapped (1886) began the “hunted-man” genre. John Buchan’s The Thirty-Nine Steps (1915) updated it for an age of geopolitics and aerial surveillance. Graham Greene’s A Gun for Sale (1936) extended its geographies and reversed the logic of pursuit, so the assassin became the quarry. From these writers Household learned the skill of pacing and the propulsive narrative power of the chase.

… .

I first read Rogue Male 20 years or so ago, rapidly and unreflectively, pulled onwards by its plot. It was only later, and on several rereadings, that the complexities of its patterns began to reveal themselves. This is a novel of elaborate design. There are paired concepts – “cover” and “open”, “surface” and “depth” – that repeat and weave. There are motifs – notably sunken tracks, tunnels, and skins/skinning – that recur dozens of times in different forms. And there is a sustained analogy between land and mind, whereby the narrator’s access to his buried emotions is enabled only by means of a literal digging into the Jurassic bedrock of south-west Dorset.

—Robert Macfarlane, from the introduction to his book (co-written with Stanley Donwood and Dan Richards) about Rogue Male, Holloway

The reader who sent in this entry into the Classics and Coffee Club notes that all the items in the photo were “bought in Seoul, KR.” The book itself was purchased at What the Book?, and English-language bookstore.

Do you have a picture of one of our books with coffee or tea (hot or iced)? Send it to this address and we’ll post them here (making you an honorary member of the Classics and Coffee Club).

There’s a club that has me as a member!

stayforthecredits:

If you figure a way to live without serving a master, any master, then let the rest of us know, will you? For you’d be the first person in the history of the world.

A true great, gone too soon. RIP PSH.

stayforthecredits:

If you figure a way to live without serving a master, any master, then let the rest of us know, will you? For you’d be the first person in the history of the world.

A true great, gone too soon. RIP PSH.

"Should we publish this book?"
“Are the words good?”
“Yes.”
“Okay, let’s publish this book."

Our office, basically. 

Publishing is a delicate science, you guys.

(via melvillehouse)

Fascinating glimpse into the inner sanctum.

(via greenapplebooks)

(via greenapplebooks)

nickdouglas:

I looked up a factoid from Emily Gould’s book “Friendship” (pre-order now because I read it all and it is good) and guys

guys there are dozens of Disney Duck family trees, several of them conflicting, in many languages

among the Goofies and Petes the females are problematically interchangeable

(via ilovecharts)

"Science fiction isn’t just thinking about the world out there. It’s also thinking about how that world might be—a particularly important exercise for those who are oppressed, because if they’re going to change the world we live in, they—and all of us—have to be able to think about a world that works differently."

— Samuel Delaney (via likestepsonthemoon)

(via kadrey)

(Source: h8ter1, via mattfractionblog)

hodgman:

driveintheaterofthemind:

thefilmstage:

Color photos from the set of Stanley Kubrick's Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb.

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I love all these lost scenes from Dr. Strangelove with Oliver Platt. When did they colorize it? 

theatlantic:

In Focus: Krampus, St. Nicholas’ Dark Companion

While Saint Nicholas may bring gifts to good boys and girls, ancient folklore in Europe’s Alpine region also tells of Krampus, a frightening beast-like creature who emerges during the Yule season, looking for naughty children to punish in horrible ways — or possibly to drag back to his lair in a sack. In keeping with pre-Germanic Pagan traditions, men dressed as these demons have been frightening children on Krampusnacht for centuries, chasing them and hitting them with sticks, on an (often alcohol-fueled) run through the dark streets.

Read more.

Tags: christmas